The City Magazine Since 1975

Season's Eatings: 10 Holiday Recipes

December 2016
Season's Eatings: 10 Holiday Recipes
Need some inspiration this year? Here are our editors’ picks—including snacks, sweet treats, and everything in between—from Charleston issues past

(Photograph by Christopher Shane)

APPS

Sugar & Spice Pecans
From the Kitchen of: Molly & Me Pecans
Featured: “Homemade for the Holidays,” December 2013
Why We Love Them: Sweet and salty with just the right amount of spice, these pecans will have your guests clamoring for more. They make great gifts, too!

Find the recipe here.

(Photograph by Johnny Autry; styled by Charlotte Autry)

Cheese Straws
From the Kitchen of: Matt Lee & Ted Lee
Featured: “40 Very Charleston Dishes,” December 2015
Why We Love Them: These cheesy, buttery, crunchy straws are easy to prepare and have been a huge hit at family gatherings and office potlucks. We like adding an extra pinch or two of red pepper flakes for more zing—but a little goes a long way!

Reprinted with permission from The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook (W.W. Norton, 2006)

Find the recipe here.

ENTREE

(Photograph by Peter Frank Edwards)

Bone-in Smoked Ham
From the Kitchen of: Anthony DiBernardo, Swig and Swine
Featured: “Chefs’ Must-Have Holiday Dishes,” December 2014
Why We Love It: This ham takes a good bit more cooking time than that of a traditional oven-baked variety, but the juicy roasted meat and its amazing smoky flavor make it well worth the effort.
Chef’s Note: “There is a difference between smoking a fresh ham, which will give you somehting more like a pork roast, and smoking a cured ham, which will be more like atraditional store-bought holiday ham.”

Find the recipe here.

VEGGIES

(Photograph by Peter Frank Edwards)

Root Veggie Latkes
From the Kitchen of: Lisa Rovich, Chef in Action
Featured: “Chefs’ Must-Have Holiday Dishes,” December 2014
Why We Love Them: With thyme and rosemary as well as date chutney, Rovich’s recipe is a colorful, dressed-up version of a longtime favorite.

Find the recipe here.

(Photograph by Ruta Elvikyte)

Gratin of Turnips, Rutabaga, & Yukon Gold Potaotes
From the Kitchen of: John Cropf, formerly of Drawing Room
Featured: Chef's Table, January 2016
Why We Love Them: What better way to serve less commonly enjoyed root vegetables like turnips and rutabagas than by smothering them in a delicious cream sauce? Even the veggie-averse will likely go in for seconds.

Find the recipe here.

(Photograph by Peter Frank Edwards)

Brussel Sprouts with Caramelized Onions & Bacon
From the Kitchen of: John Ondo, Lana restaurant & Bar & the upcoming Kairos
Featured: “Home for the Holidays,” December 2012
Why We Love Them: Nutty, plump, emerald-colored orbs made decadent with crispy bacon they're a definitely crave-worthy side.

Find the recipe here.

DESSERT

(Photograph by Christopher Shane)

Pignoli Cookies
From the Kitchen of: Celia’s of Charleston
Featured: “Homemade for the Holidays,” December 2013
Why We Love Them: The perfect accompaniment to after-dinner coffee Adapted from How to Bake by Nick Malgieri, Willima Morrow Cookbooks (1995)

Find the recipe here.

(Photograph by Peter Frank Edwards)

Eggnog Cheesecake
From the Kitchen of: Lauren Mitterer, WildFlour Bakery
Featured: “Homemade for the Holidays,” December 2012
Why We Love It: Everything Lauren “Mitty” Mitterer whips up is induigently to-die-for, and this cheesecake is no exception. But it’s her creative use of eggnog, paired with a brandy-infused mascarpone and crunchy candied pecans, that gets our vote for a favorite holiday dessert.

Find the recipe here.

SWEETS

(Photograph by Christopher Shane)

Peppermint Bark
From the Kitchen of: Village Bakery & Cafe
Featured: “Homemade for the Holidays,” December 2013
Why We Love It: Everyone enjoys these old-fashioned treats, and they’re a cinch to make.

Find the recipe here.

(Photograph by Christopher Shane)

Sesame Seed Toffee
From the Kitchen of: Mark Gray and David Vagasky, Cacao Artisan Chocolate
Featured: “Homemade for the Holidays,” December 2013
Chefs’ Note: “Exercise caution when working with sugar syrups cooked to a high temperature. Don’t leave the stove, keep the dogs and kids out of the kitchen, stay off the phone; and if the doorbell rings, stay put with your pot of sugar and butter!”

Find the recipe here.

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