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  • March 2014

    Each spring, azalea blooms turn the Lowcountry landscape into a kaleidoscope of pink, red, purple, magenta, and white. Called the “Royalty of the Garden” by horticulturists, this member of the Rhododendron genus is a favorite around the globe for its vivid colors, profusion of flowers, and adaptability to a wide range of soils—but did you know the Lowcountry has played a notable role in its popularization?

  • March 2014

    Meet Dana Stevens, the L.A. writer and producer who set sultry new legal drama Reckless here in Charleston. 

  • February 2014

    What's in store for Charleston's International African American Museum

  • February 2014

    Heard the term “freedman’s cottage” used to refer to a one-room-wide, single-story home on the peninsula? Well, it’s actually somewhat of a misnomer developed in recent decades to describe a form of vernacular architecture occupied by people of many ethnicities. Built from the 1860s to early 1900s, these unique structures are more accurately called “Charleston cottages,” and though many have been altered or eradicated for newer construction, they’re finally gaining respect for their distinct importance to our social and architectural history.

  • February 2014
  • January 2014

    A North Charleston biz booms by camouflaging cellular antennae 

  • January 2014

    Charleston abounds with images of the pineapple—in art, architecture, even notepaper and handmade jewelry. While the city isn’t responsible for making the tropical fruit a symbol of hospitality, its mannerly residents certainly embraced the custom early on and carry it forward today. Here, learn some sweet facts to spout the next time a visitor asks you to snap their photo in front of the iconic Pineapple Fountain at Waterfront Park

  • January 2014

    Brandy Culp makes collections from Charleston’s past her present tense

  • December 2013

    From restaurants to a resident sports team, much of Charleston bears the branding work of graphic designer Gil Shuler

  • December 2013

    Our taste & tell guide to the latest F&B openings in Charleston

  • December 2013

    The Holy City has become a renowned culinary destination, but few know the Lowcountry’s true haute-cuisine history—a legacy of African-American slave cooks-turned-caterers and immigrant restaurateurs

  • October 2013

    Get in the spirit of All Hallow's Eve and head out to some of the Lowcountry’s spookiest spots. Supernatural occurrences around the Lowcountry are as abundant as the oysters along its salty channels. And hauntings come as no surprise in an old city that has witnessed its fair share of battles and crimes as well as disastrous acts of Mother Nature. From the well-preserved neighborhoods of the peninsula to the deeply storied plantations, remnants of energy from past lives and deaths still linger, says local ghost tour guide and author Geordie Buxton. Here, he shares some spirited stories from his books on Charleston’s haunted history, as well as phenomena recently collected for his newest release, Supernatural Charleston: A Holy City Requiem

     

  • October 2013

    It just might be the most unusual—and enjoyable—of all Charleston creations. 

  • September 2013

    National accolades and “Best-of” designations have stacked up for Charleston in recent years, but we’ve known all along that ours is the best city in the world.

  • September 2013

    One local writer ponders just how Southern, charming, and real Bravo’s new TV show set in Charleston could possibly be

  • August 2013
  • August 2013

    Dorothea Benton Frank takes on brutal truths in her new novel with her signature humor and storytelling prowess

  • April 2013

    Banking powerhouse Darla Moore is plowing new fields and putting her money where her boots are—on the ground

  • April 2013

    Three savory Burden Creek Dairy goat cheese dishes from Carolina’s chef Jill Mathias

  • March 2013

    Can you imagine Charleston without ornamental wrought iron?



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