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How To

Making a cheese plate can be intimidating—does Brie go with bleu? And what wines pair well with goat cheese?—but Trudi Wagner and Patty Floersheimer, co-owners of Church Street fromagerie goat.sheep.cow, tell us it’s actually a cinch. Just in time for summer entertaining, they share foolproof tips for crafting the perfect version.

Before signing on to run the kitchen and charcuterie program at Edmund’s Oast, Andy Henderson worked at Local Mission Eatery, a farm-to-table San Francisco spot that debuted on St. Patrick’s Day in 2010. The chef made corned beef for that inaugural menu, and the Irish-American dish has had a special place in his heart ever since. Come March 17, follow his steps below to whip up a batch at home.

David Vagasky and Mark Gray of Cacao’s Artisan Chocolate share their method

Cozy up to this take on a classic style

Cacao’s Artisan Chocolate co-owners David Vagasky and Mark Gray are masters of the art and science of candy making—particularly when it comes to their popular chocolate sea-salt caramels. “And this recipe really is a science,” says Vagasky, noting that the chocolate must be heated to an exact degree, then tempered, or cooled on a flat surface to allow molecular realignment. Here, the chocolatiers share their method for crafting the candies. It’s a bit of a process, which makes the finished product a particularly sweet holiday gift

Josh Keeler hails from Pennsylvania, where he grew up eating sauerkraut and pork on New Year’s Day. (In German and Pennsylvania Dutch cultures, the dish is thought to bring good luck for the coming year.) Today, as the chef and co-owner of Two Boroughs Larder, he uses the stuff year-round to garnish oysters and perk up hot dogs and pickle plates. Here’s how he makes it, in six easy steps

Holidays mean special dishes, and when talking about Hanukkah, that can only be one thing: potato pancakes.

Don’t let the fact that he’s a New Jersey native fool you—Charleston Farmers Market vendor Mike Shaughnessy knows boiled peanuts.

As any Southerner will tell you, true Dixie cooking is done with cast iron. But woe to he who mistreats this often-heirloom houseware.