The City Magazine Since 1975

So Charleston

November 2019
This is Lowcountry cooking: a simple, yet flavorful, one-pot meal that combines fresh local shrimp, corn on the cob,...

October 2019
Brightly striped and spotted in orange and black, the colorful Gulf fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) is a familiar sight...

September 2019
Gossypium has been spun as “the fabric of our lives” for good reason. Scientists have discovered evidence of cotton...

August 2019
Ghost crabs scuttle across the sand faster than you can say Ocypode quadrata, the scientific name for this sand crab...

July 2019
What started out as informal races in the late1700s between oar-powered plantation boats carrying crops to town became...

June 2019
Anywhere sharks have swum, their teeth are sure to be found. And Lowcountry rivers and beaches provide bountiful...

May 2019
Avenues of oaks and their deep-rooted history in Charleston

April 2019
From Edisto and Beaufort to McClellanville and Georgetown, each morning during shrimp season the air fills with the...

March 2019
On March 18, 1839, the Irish organization known as the Hibernian Society laid the first cornerstone for a new hall at...

February 2019
Explorer John Lawson—who visited South Carolina in 1700—gives an apt introduction to Aix sponsa, whose nicknames...

January 2019
Since 1687, the French Protestants known as Huguenots and their descendants have worshipped at the corner of Church and...

December 2018
One of the Lowcountry’s most prolific evergreens is the wax myrtle (Morella cerifera). It grows easily and everywhere—...

November 2018
When Philip Simmons (1912-2009) began to study the craft of ironwork as a 13-year-old apprentice to Holy City...

October 2018
Throughout history, locals have laid their dead to rest with love, respect, and—at times—unparalleled Charleston style...

September 2018
Named for its unusual shape, the American horseshoe crab has been called a “living fossil,” as it has been on Earth...

August 2018
Find yourself envisioning Jurassic Park’s flying dinosaurs when you see a brown pelican mid-air? You aren’t far off. ...

July 2018
The ”Great Shake” of August 31, 1886, was one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded on the East Coast. Its epicenter...

June 2018
Tomato pie, tomato pilau, tomato gumbo, okra and tomatoes, fried green tomatoes, tomato relish: no question about it,...

May 2018
Despite their great size, long lifespan (50-plus years), and an armor-like shell that helps protect them from natural...

April 2018
Silver was the preferred metal for dining, drinking, lighting, and decorative ware in the early Charleston home, and...

March 2018
Each spring, the bright yellow flowers of Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) announce the new season in...

February 2018
The brown, floppy-eared pooch known as the “Boykin spaniel” today seems omnipresent in the Holy City—especially during...

January 2018
They’re affixed to structures throughout the Historic District and beyond: circular plaques mingling English and Latin...

December 2017
Reflecting on blended family traditions and creating new ones

December 2017
At four Holy City churches, bells are rung to changes in the English tradition—an art form more rare than many realize 

November 2017
The svelte, long-legged bird known as Meleagris gallopavo is quite a different beast than the fat and juicy turkey that...

October 2017
“When you steps in it, you sticks,” say the Gullah people of the gooey marsh mud that lines Lowcountry creeks. “Smells...

September 2017
During periods of drought, folks uninitiated in the magical ways of Pleopeltis polypodioides may spy the epiphyte fern’...

August 2017
If you’ve never grown an okra plant—merely enjoying someone else’s crop deliciously fried, boiled, steamed, stewed,...

June 2017
Washed up jellies, scampering crustaceans, tiny shells bound mysteriously into chains: all are common finds on South...