The City Magazine Since 1975

A Larger Canvas

May 2017
A Larger Canvas

This month, the 14-year-old Redux Contemporary Art Center leaves behind its St. Philip Street digs for a bigger, better facility on the first floor of 1056 King Street—a place designed some 75 years ago with arts of a different kind in mind. Here, learn about the building’s past, as well as how Redux will use it to foster creativity into the future

Gabriel Lovejoy's work, including Globule No. 1 (above), will be on exhibit in Redux’s main gallery. 

38 studio spaces occupy the new Redux—an impressive increase from the former total of 16. At press time, 100% were already rented by artists paying $285 to $580 a month.

Eight week-long summer camp sessions keep kids creatively entertained this July and August. Good luck choosing among offerings like printmaking with Kristen Solecki and circus arts—acrobatics, unicycling, plate-spinning, and more—with champion jugglers Deena Frooman and Matthew Swope.

15,000 square feet (more than twice that offered by the old building!) will be filled not only with studios, but also with an expanded photography center, a classroom, and exhibition and performance space­—almost 2,000 square feet of it.

$65-$95 per month gains members round-the-clock access to the dark room and print studio, including screenprinting, intaglio, drypoint, monotype, and letterpress equipment. Just need 
a day? That’s an option, too!

May 6’s opening party kicks off an action-packed month that includes 4 simultaneous art installations; a May 13 concert by Young Mister and Michael Flynn; a May 20 Carolina Youth Action Project fundraiser; May 27’s We Are Family Queer Prom; and more. Find details at www.reduxstudios.org.

1941: the year the Sottile family hired local architect Augustus Constantine, known for his Art Moderne style, to design the building at 1056 King. Intended for a theater, it instead became a library—and possibly a barracks—for the U.S. Navy during WWII. Still, Augustus would surely be glad to know that his grandson, Chris Constantine, served as mechanical engineer for the Redux revamp.

Resources: 

Image (Globule No. 1 by Gabriel Lovejoy) courtesy of Redux Contemporary Art Center