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History

A residence custom-designed for the Holy City and tailored over time to suit our climate and society to perfection: of all the things that make this town special, the Charleston single, one of downtown’s most prominent architectural styles, has got to be top-of-the-list. Find out why the homes face south and sideways and how “haint blue” and “northside manners” factor in.

Charleston Hardware sells a myriad of lines of meticulous reproductions

The “glorious” homecoming of the 54th Massachusetts’ Sergeant Joseph H. Barquet

The law says “lights out” during nesting season, but all things loggerhead are in the limelight as this beloved  yet threatened species mounts a comeback—we hope

The Preservation Society of Charleston rallies support around their 2013 list of “Seven to Save”

Can you imagine Charleston without ornamental wrought iron?

Grahame Long reveals a murderous side of Holy City history in Dueling in Charleston

The Jubilee Project kicks off with a New Year’s Emancipation celebration

Tracing the Charleston Symphony Orchestra back to its early 20th-century roots

Gertrude Legendre blazed her own trail as a big-game hunter and preservation-minded Lowcountry socialite

From dancing children to local notables, sculptor Willard Hirsch helped shape the city

Replicating Holy City style was all the rage in the '30s and '40s

The trailblazing Dart family turned the page on education and literacy for local Afican-Americans

How one woman’s final act of generosity transformed her family’s beloved farm into a future county park

Sprouts & Krauts’ quick and healthy fare drew loyal fans to Marion Square Mall

A revered family, a renowned plantation, and a reclaimed legacy are the ties that bind at the Middleton family reunion

Before bridges criss-crossed the Lowcountry, boats transported residents from town to beach and countryside

Read the romantic sagas of three legendary local couples— the Dawsons, the Heywards, and the Warings— whose shared passions helped rewrite the course of history

As the nation’s first archaeologist, Lowcountry native John Izard Middleton made history even as he was recording it

As the American colonies rebelled against England, a father and son found themselves battling for personal emancipation

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